About Adana

The history of Adana goes back 3,000 years; Archaeological findings in the region have revealed human settlements dating back to the Paleolithic Age. Tepebağ Mound, where archaeologists found a stone wall and a city center, was built in the Neolithic Age and is considered to be the oldest city in the Çukurova region. A place called Adana is mentioned in the Gilgamesh Epic, one of the Sumerian epics; however, the geography of this study is too ambiguous to determine the location of the aforementioned place.

According to the Hittite Kava inscriptions found in Hattusas (Boğazkale), Kizzuwatna was the first kingdom to rule Adana under the protection of the Hittites around 1335 BC. At the same time, the city was called Uru Adaniya and its inhabitants were called Danuna. In the years between 1191-1189 BC, with the collapse of the Hittite Empire, the western-based raids caused the control of the plain to pass to many small-scale kingdoms. Persians, Alexander the Great in 6th century BC 333; Seleucids; Cilician pirates; Pompey the Roman Empire Man; and the Cilicia Armenian Kingdom (Kingdom of Cilicia) had a say in the control of the region.

Adana’s history is essentially related to the history of Tarsus; Since the location of these two cities adjacent to the Seyhan River was changed by the river, these cities are often referred to as the same city and the name has changed according to the course of centuries. During the Roman period, Adana was of relatively little importance and at that time Tarsus was the metropolis of the region. In the period of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, the city was used as a prison for the Cilician pirates. A few centuries later a local station was established in the city on the Roman military road going east. Following the decisive collapse of the Roman Empire in AD 395, the region became a part of the Byzantine Empire and probably flourished during the reign of Julianus. With the construction of large bridges, roads, government buildings, irrigation and nurseries, Adana and Cilicia have become the most important and developed trade centers of the region. Especially during the Cilician period, Ayas (today’s Yumurtalık) and Kozan (formerly Sis) were the other major cities and administrative centers in the region.

Throughout the history of Adana, Luwian Kingdom (1900 BC), Arzava Kingdom (1500-1333 BC), Hittite Empire (1900-1200 BC), Assyrians (713-663 BC), Persian Empire (550-333 BC), Hellenic Ancient Greek Civilization (333-323 BC), Seleucid Empire (312-133 BC), Cilician Principality (178-112), Romans (112-395 BC), Byzantine Empire (395-638; 964-1071), Abbasids, Great Seljuk Empire, Mamelukes, Ramazanoğlu Principality has entered under the Ottoman Empire and Turkey’s sovereignty.

The Varda Bridge, which is located about one kilometer south west of Hacıkırı Village of Karaisalı District in Adana-Ankara direction, is called Koca Bridge by the locals. It was built in 1907-1912 to complete the Istanbul-Baghdad-Hejaz railway line with the contract signed by the Ottoman Ruler Abdulhamid II and the German Emperor Kaiser Wilhem. The bridge is 99 meters high and 172 meters long and connects a deep valley. Another important and interesting feature of the Varda Bridge is that it is not a straight bridge but bends.

The official source about Taşköprü (Saros Bridge), known as the Justinianus Bridge in history, the inscription in the Adana Museum is written by the architect Auxentios in the 4th century. According to Evliya Çelebi, it has reached today that there are 50 steps in total, that it has 21 spans, 14 large arches and the technique in Roman bridges can also be seen here. Almost all of the arches used in the Stone Bridge are of different sizes. The reason for this is due to the construction technique of the bridge from different periods. 5 small evacuation arches

Ramazanoğulları Mosque or Adana Ulu Mosque is a historical mosque from the 16th century in Adana.The mosque, which is the masterpiece of the Ramazanoğulları Principality, is one of the most important historical buildings of the city. Until the opening of the Sabancı Central Mosque in 1998, it remained the largest mosque in Adana. Its production was started by Ramazanoğlu Halil Bey in 1509; It was completed in 1541 by his son Piri Mehmet Pasha upon the death of Halil Bey.

It is built in the style of classical Ottoman architecture and sits on nine elephant legs. It is similar to the Sultan Ahmet Mosque in general appearance and to the Selimiye Mosque in terms of plan and interior. It has four semi-domes, five domes, and six minarets; these correspond to the four caliphs and four sects, the five pillars of Islam, the six pillars of faith. The main dome with a diameter of 32 meters has 32 obituaries, 28 domes in the courtyard have 28 prophets mentioned in the Quran, 40 windows in the main dome live and pray for 40 rak’ahs, 6 minarets of 99 meters Corresponds to the beautiful name

The official source about Taşköprü (Saros Bridge), known as the Justinianus Bridge in history, the inscription in the Adana Museum is written by the architect Auxentios in the 4th century. According to Evliya Çelebi, it has reached today that there are 50 steps in total, that it has 21 spans, 14 large arches and the technique in Roman bridges can also be seen here. Almost all of the arches used in the Stone Bridge are of different sizes. The reason for this is due to the construction technique of the bridge from different periods. 5 small evacuation arches

Kapıkaya Canyon is the canyon located in Kapıkaya village in the Karaisalı district of Adana province. Çakıt Creek, one of the branches of Seyhan River, opened the canyon. Çakıt Stream is the western branch of Seyhan River. It extends from the Pozantı Strait towards the mountainous areas. Kanyon is 2 km from Varda Bridge. Vegetation around the canyon; It consists of oleander, olive, carob and plane trees. 7.25 km of the 20 km canyon is arranged as a walking path and nature walks are made.